Dealing With The Doubts In Your Life

Having doubts about things and circumstances in life is probably thought of as normal in the unbeliever. However, as Christians, we should be secure in our mind as to the truth of God and God’s word, the bible. The issue of doubt is discussed in the bible, where it says, “But he must ask in faith, without doubting, because he who doubts is like a wave of the sea, blown and tossed by the wind. That man should not expect to receive anything from the Lord. He is a double-minded man, unstable in all his ways.”—James 1:6-8

Do you have trouble with doubts with just about everything including your walk with the Lord? The following is a list of different types of emotional doubt that can impact your walk with the Lord. Take a look at this list and see if there is any type of doubt that you’ve experienced in your life. Then, it’s important to recognize that God wants to help you in this area of your life.

a) psychological causes: The most common cause of emotional doubts (and perhaps even all types of uncertainty) stems from psychological states such as anxiety or depression and, in particular, moods which persons frequently undergo. In fact, in a certain select sense, psychological doubt as a whole might be termed mood-related. At any rate, this brand of questioning often masquerades as factual doubt but must be dealt with in a different manner. It has been shown that to many individuals who assumed that their problem had to do with evidence for faith, only to discover that the true cause was their attitude towards the subject.

b) medical causes: Doubt can also come from any number of medical factors, including internal conditions such as manic depressive states or diabetes on the one hand, or externally prompted conditions caused by the consumption of alcohol or other types of drugs. To be sure, it is frequently not an easy matter to decide which of such factors are internally or externally motivated. But while the central cause is medical in nature, doubts which originate in this manner manifest themselves in chiefly emotional patterns. The lesson here concerns the needed input of the medical community on various issues surrounding the treatment of doubts.

c) faulty view of God: To have a wrong concept of God can be very instrumental in the formulation of doubt. And, of course, while it could be argued that no believer would have a perfect view of God, some specific patterns of thought are potentially more harmful than others. For instance, to believe that God does not answer prayers, especially during times of stress or that He is morally responsible for pain will frequently lead to constant personal crises. So if assurance depends on our view of God and His faithfulness, then this is certainly an area which needs constant cultivation and development in the believer’s life.

d) childhood problems: Experiences which one undergoes in his younger years can have a profound affect on later doubt. For example, child abuse in various forms can make it very difficult for one to accept God’s love. People struggle with how God could ever love them; it is very difficult to convince them otherwise.

e) old wounds: Somewhat related to the previous type of doubt derived from childhood problems, this variety is caused by painful situations throughout life. Breaking up with a lover, the death of a loved one or the betrayal of a friend are examples of wounds which could cause a person to wonder if he can fully trust God. In many respects the results of such questioning are similar to that in the former category.

f) judging by feelings: A very common problem, especially with Christians who lack assurance of salvation, comes from reactions based on one’s feelings. “Sometimes I don’t feel saved” or “I don’t have the same feeling which I used to” are regular fare for the counselor. In fact, the feeling that Christianity might not be true after all may besiege all believers at some point.

g) need for attention: In some cases, the expression of doubt is most obviously due to the need for friendship and love, often from one who feels that these are somehow lacking in his own life. The doubt could certainly be real, but the need for companionship attention and love could be even greater, to the point where the problem never seems to get solved.

h) lack of sleep: A commonly overlooked cause of doubt can sometimes be remedied as simply as getting a normal amount of sleep. A biblical example here is Elijah, who, when he experienced depression, laid down to sleep. After Elijah had rested, an angel recommended food (I Kings 19:4-6).

i) peer pressure: It has long been thought that one of the categories of doubt which is seldom mentioned but is extremely important is the pressure exerted on believers to be more moderate in their views. This assault is not a frontal attack, but is one which can continue to build up to quite a persuasive drone in its call to stop believing old “wives tales” in favor of “modern” approaches. To be more like our peers is often a desire which is difficult not to heed, at least in part. In fact the belief (whether true or false) that few other intelligent persons hold our position can produce devastating results, especially over a period of time. The doubt which is produced generally professes no new facts, just the same old temptations to change.

j) Christian hypocrisy: Doubt can sometimes be caused by observing the beliefs and actions of fellow believers. Religious wars, persecutions, inquisitions and questionable stances on such issues as “slavery, race, war, women’s rights, and social justice” are examples of the potentially offensive beliefs and behaviors of Christians which can, in turn, cause doubts.

k) forgiven sin: The fear that one’s sins have not really been forgiven is a cause for doubt in many believers. More specifically, the idea that one has committed the unpardonable sin so that one cannot be forgiven strikes even more fear in the hearts of others. So while such quandaries can have factual ramifications, they perhaps more frequently are manifested in emotional terms. And while a good exegesis of relevant Scripture portions may certainly be called for as a crucially important part of the cure, the emotional elements will frequently have to be dealt with, as well.

l) anxiety about the future: It is not enough for Christians to be worried about the present. To be honest, anxiety concerning the unknown future has probably been a cause for fear in most believers at some time or another. For some, it is manifested in the query as to whether they can really “hold out” until the end. Again, a study of the Scripture and perhaps some treatment of the emotional portion is needed in order to show that this fear is misplaced.

m) judgment and Hell: Even in believers one frequently encounters the uncertainty that, after all, perhaps it is still the case that one could have done everything that the Bible requires for salvation (as far as one knows) but still be sent to Hell. If informal surveys can be trusted at all, this fear is very widely experienced by many Christians at least at some time. And, as in the cases of the previous two types of fear, both Scriptural exegesis and treatment of the emotional factors may be required.

So, there you have it. As you can see there are many different types of doubt, all of which can be dealt with through continued prayer and faith in our Lord. God is always there for you and will relieve any anxiety you might have. From A to Z in doubts, God has got your back. So, let go of your doubts today and believe God’s word for you. He loves you that much.

God Is Our Refuge And Strength; In Him We Find Delight

The word refuge may be translated “mansion,” or “abiding-place,” which gives the thought that God is our abode, our home. There is a fullness and sweetness in the metaphor, for dear to our hearts is our home, although it be the humblest cottage, or the scantiest garret; and dearer far is our blessed God, in whom we live, and move, and have our being.

It is at home that we feel safe: we shut the world out and dwell in quiet security. So when we are with our God we “fear no evil.” He is our shelter and retreat, our abiding refuge. At home, we take our rest; it is there we find repose after the fatigue and toil of the day. And so our hearts find rest in God, when, wearied with life’s conflict, we turn to him, and our soul dwells at ease. At home, also, we let our hearts loose; we are not afraid of being misunderstood, nor of our words being misconstrued.

So when we are with God we can commune freely with him, laying open all our hidden desires; for if the “secret of the Lord is with them that fear him,” the secrets of them that fear him ought to be, and must be, with their Lord. Home, too, is the place of our truest and purest happiness: and it is in God that our hearts find their deepest delight.

How Do You Handle Feelings of Anxiety?—Here’s The Answer.

What do people do with feelings of anxiety or fear? Aside from those who are medically diagnosed with anxiety disorders, fearful people tend to fuss and worry over potential scenarios and outcomes. They might rehearse the possibilities in their mind and take worries to bed, which keeps them tossing and turning all night. Or maybe they try to numb themselves with distractions, drugs or alcohol.

God wants us to bring our worries to Him—then He can calm our anxious burdens with His peace, which surpasses all comprehension (Phil. 4:6-7). And today we have advantages that weren’t available in the days of the Old Testament. Instead of waiting for a prophet to deliver a message from the Lord, we have the completed Scriptures, which are God’s revelation of Himself, His works, and His ways. Through His Word, we learn to know and understand the Lord and His plans so we can pray more confidently.

As we spend time in the Scriptures, we can increasingly see from God’s perspective. Then our prayers will be focused on what He wills rather than on what we want. Through this kind of prayer, our spiritual needs are met, and we can set aside anxiety to live in complete trust in the Lord.

God Is Our Rock. An Unshakable Foundation.

With each passing year, the instability in the world seems more and more apparent. Natural and man-made catastrophes claim lives; political balance shifts; wealth and status come and go. It all causes us to ask, Is anything unshakable?

As overwhelming as these things seem, let me give you an even bigger example. In today’s passage (2 Peter 3:10-13), we read that the heavens and earth will be shaken. It will all be destroyed—burned, to be exact. Thankfully, we have the promise that God will create new heavens and a new earth, but in the meantime our world will undergo great turmoil.

Instability can create feelings of insecurity and fear unless we latch onto the truths God has given us. The Bible refers to Jesus as a rock and firm foundation (1 Corinthians 3:10-11; Eph. 2:20). And we know that God is unchangeable and sovereign; nothing can undermine or move Him. His Word is truth, and it will last forever.

As Christians, we know that our eternal relationship with God is secure. We’ve been adopted as His children, and nothing can rob us of this position. What’s more, believers are assured of an eternal home with Him. Though we may at times feel unsettled by our circumstances, we can rejoice when trials bring us humbly to the cross of Jesus, where we will find peace and safety.

What assurance we have as God’s children! We can rest in peace and full confidence, knowing that our hearts are secure in Jesus Christ. As King David said in Psalm 16:8, “I have set the Lord continually before me; because He is at my right hand, I will not be shaken.”

Perfect Love Drives out Fear

Fear causes anxiety, dread, alarm, fright, panic, and terror. It causes all kinds of unpleasant emotions, phobias, neuroses, and even the more serious psychotic disorders. The torment of fear is one of the worst problems we humans face. God’s Word teaches that being a slave to fear indicates that we have not been made perfect in love. We are not fully grasping (perfecting) God’s love and care of God for us. As a result, we are not loving other people like we should; we are not growing more and more in love.

In addition, being gripped by fear indicates when we are inward-focused. Our eyes are on ourselves, not on God and others like they should be.

In summary, we can only be set free from fear by the perfect love of God. The more we know of God’s love and care and the more we love other people, the more fear is conquered in our lives. The reason is clearly seen in the promises of God. God loves us so much that He will take care of us through all the trials and temptations of life, no matter what they are.

How Far Would You Go To Spread The “Good News?”

How far would you go to spread the gospel of Jesus Christ? A little way or a long way? Paul the apostle traveled over 10,000 miles in the days of his ministry. To put things in perspective, the distance Paul traveled would be equivalent to walking back and forth across the United States five times from New York to Los Angeles.

That’s quite an accomplishment when you think about it. What about you? Are you willing to walk next door to an unsaved neighbor’s house or even further? Paul talked about how blessed he was by carrying on with his duties to reach the unsaved. We can be blessed also and a blessing to others by loving the Lord enough to want to make sure everyone hears about Jesus’ atoning sacrificial death.

Don’t let fear be your guide that prevents you from sharing with others the “good news.” Fear is a tool of Satan. Listen to the Holy Spirit and he will not only guide you but give you the words to say at the right time that will have an impact on whoever you are talking to.

Step out. Take a chance. And then hear God say to you, “Well done, good and faithful servant.”

Don’t worry or be anxious. Live today in Christ.

In many places in the Bible we are told not to worry, or be anxious, or be fearful about what the future may hold. Indeed, the Apostle Paul said that we shouldn’t be anxious about anything (Philippians 4:6). Apart from the torment they put us through, the trouble with worry, anxiety, and fear is that they are a waste of time. Instead of spending our time dealing with what we have been called to do today, we waste it by worrying and being anxious about how we will deal with what we have to do tomorrow.

Life in Christ is meant to be lived day by day. Tomorrow is tomorrow and should be dealt with then. Today is today and should be dealt with now.

God’s grace and anointing are for today. Don’t waste today worrying and being anxious about tomorrow. Cast your anxieties about the future on God, because He cares for you (I Peter 5:7).