Do Christians have to obey the Old Testament law?

The key to understanding the relationship between the Christian and the Law is knowing that the Old Testament law was given to the nation of Israel, not to Christians. Some of the laws were to reveal to the Israelites how to obey and please God (the Ten Commandments, for example). Some of the laws were to show the Israelites how to worship God and atone for sin (the sacrificial system). Some of the laws were intended to make the Israelites distinct from other nations (the food and clothing rules). None of the Old Testament law is binding on Christians today. When Jesus died on the cross, He put an end to the Old Testament law (Romans 10:4; Galatians 3:23–25; Ephesians 2:15).

In place of the Old Testament law, Christians are under the law of Christ (Galatians 6:2), which is to “love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul and with all your mind…and to love your neighbor as yourself” (Matthew 22:37-39). If we obey those two commands, we will be fulfilling all that Christ requires of us: “All the Law and the Prophets hang on these two commandments” (Matthew 22:40).

How Will It All End?—The Church Is Triumphant!

The book of Revelation which is the last book of the bible spells out in vivid detail what will happen on Jesus Christ’s return. Chapter 22 is the final chapter of the Book of Revelation and is properly the epilogue, or conclusion.

The main purposes of the visions John has in the Book of Revelation are accomplished; the enemies of the church are conquered; the church is triumphant; the affairs of the world are wound up; the redeemed are received to their blissful, eternal abode; the wicked are cut off; the earth is purified, and the affairs of the universe are fixed on their permanent foundation. There are a few miscellaneous matters that close this last chapter in the bible.

There is a solemn affirmation on the part of him who had made these revelations, that they are true, and that they will be speedily accomplished, and that he will be blessed or happy who shall keep the sayings of the book.

And, finally, a command was given not to seal up what had been revealed, since the time was near. These things would soon have their fulfillment, and it was proper that the prophecies should be unsealed, or open. The final result of all these things, is to find consolation in the assurance of the final triumph of the Son of God.

Satan has been conquered and we will never have to deal with him again. Praise God from whom all blessings flow.

For more encouragement, visit my other blog at https://fromsintosalvation.home.blog/

Do You Trust God To Do What He Promises To Do?

God wants us to make right decisions, which means choices that align with His will. He has promised to give us instruction and direction so we’ll know how to proceed (Psalm 32:8).

Although we all want quick answers from the Lord, Scripture tells us to pray tirelessly, without giving up. Persisting in prayer positions us to be drawn closer to God, where we are better prepared to hear from Him.

Trusting in God’s promises will lift us above our doubts into a place of quiet rest. We may not have an answer yet, but in waiting on Him with hopeful expectation, we’ll experience His “peace which surpasses all comprehension” (Phil. 4:7).

Scripture urges us to let Christ’s peace rule in our heart (Col. 3:15). Doing so will help us find our way past confusion and receive His clear direction without doubting. Discovering God’s will is worth every effort we make and any time spent waiting.

Is It Almost Or Is It For Sure?

Almost. It’s a sad word in any man’s dictionary. It runs with nearly, next time, and just about! It’s a word that smacks with missed opportunities. It’s an honorable mention, being on the bench, and burnt cookies!

One of the most famous “almosts” is in the Bible. His name was Pilate. He almost performed what would have been history’s greatest act of mercy. He almost pardoned the Prince of Peace.  He almost released the Son of God. He had the power. He had the choice. The option to free God’s Son was his. And he did…almost!

Jesus never has room for almost. With Him nearly becomes certainly. Sometimes becomes always. And next time becomes this time! Almost may count in horseshoes, but with the Master, it’s just as if it never happened.

How Far Would You Travel On Foot To Worship And Celebrate Jesus’ Birth?

Last night on 60 Minutes, they aired a program about some churches in Lalibela, Ethiopia that had been chiseled out of stone. To be precise each church was carved out of one big stone. To see the results was impressive.

The carving of these churches date back almost 1,000 years according to a local historian. Their presence has had a significant impact on the people of Ethiopia, since they believe the churches were carved by angels.

The moderator for 60 Minutes, Scott Pelley, interviewed one of the professionals dedicated to preserving these churches. Scott asked him why these churches were so important. The individual answered that the people of Ethiopia travel for days and sometimes months on foot to come to that location to worship. The historian said that the people believe God inhabits the churches and they want to be where God is.

Can you imagine traveling for days, weeks, or even months on foot to worship at a church? Not just any church but one believed to be carved out by angels and inhabited by God. For me personally, I am amazed at their devotion to God and worshiping His son Jesus. I only hope I can be as devoted as the Ethiopians in this story.

How far and how long would you travel on foot to worship Jesus? It’s definitely something to consider and pray about.

Developing a Servant Spirit

Personal ambition and servant-hood aren’t always compatible. In fact, they are often at odds with each other. A servant’s goal is to please his or her master in whatever way is required, but personal ambition strives for self-advancement. Jesus’ words from today’s passage must have sounded foreign to the disciples’ ears since, according to the thinking of their culture, greatness was acquired by striving for it, not by serving.

Like them, we live in a world where many people are seeking to make a name for themselves. They set goals, make plans, and do whatever is necessary to achieve what they’ve set out to do. But as Christians, we’re to live by a different standard: exalt Christ, obey His commands, and serve Him faithfully by doing His will, not our own.

We’re not called to gain fame and fortune by leaving our footprints in concrete for all to admire.  Our task is to humbly follow in Jesus’ footsteps. Whether our lives have a large or small impact is up to God, not us. The greatest acts of service are not usually flashy displays; more often they’re commonplace gestures like being kind to strangers, ministering to fellow believers, and praying for others.

Jesus humbled Himself, surrendered His rights, and obeyed God even to the point of death on the cross (Phil. 2:5-8). Being His servant begins with the same attitude. It requires helping others when it’s not convenient, doing tasks that are not glamorous, and obeying the Lord even if it’s costly. We aren’t on earth to build our own kingdom but to faithfully serve God as He builds His.

A Companion of Fools Will Suffer Harm Through Compromise

“Walk with the wise and become wise, for a companion of fools suffers harm”—Proverbs 13:20

Compromise may be helpful for some relationships, but it can hurt our spiritual journey. Bending God’s principles is risky.

For example, suppose a Christian man makes some new acquaintances, who don’t share his beliefs. Having grown up in the church, he has practically memorized Proverbs 13:20—“Walk with the wise and become wise, for a companion of fools suffers harm”—and recognizes the verse is meant to protect Christians from worldly influences. But he rationalizes that spending time here or there with these friends won’t hurt him. Eventually, however, he ends up spending more time with them than with believers and begins to question his own beliefs. Heeding that proverb might have helped him avoid drifting away from the heavenly Father.

To navigate such situations, we must look ahead for possible danger. Even choices that seem trivial can have far-reaching consequences. But the Lord equips us with a conscience and the Holy Spirit, who sounds an alarm if we veer into dangerous territory.

For us to hear these warnings, our heart must be tuned into God’s Spirit and Word. Relying on our own understanding can lead to trouble. But those who trust the Lord and apply His principles will find straight paths through potentially dangerous situations.